Peroneal response to inversion increases with shoe sole thickness

Wearing thick-soled shoes increases the magnitude of peroneus longus muscle activity required to resist an unanticipated foot inversion, elevating the risk of an ankle sprain, according to research from the University of Dundee in Scotland. Investigators used electromyography to assess peroneus longus activity in 38 healthy participants standing on a platform designed to invert from 0° to 20° without warning. Participants were tested while barefoot and while wearing shoes with soles of varying thicknesses, up to 5 cm

Wearing thick-soled shoes increases the magnitude of peroneus longus muscle activity required to resist an unanticipated foot inversion, elevating the risk of an ankle sprain, according to research from the University of Dundee in Scotland. Investigators used electromyography to assess peroneus longus activity in 38 healthy participants standing on a platform designed to invert from 0° to 20° without warning. Participants were tested while barefoot and while wearing shoes with soles of varying thicknesses, up to 5 cm

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Peroneal response to inversion increases with shoe sole thickness