Out on a limb: Critical care

Emily Delzell, Project editor Hopefully none of the practitioners who read LER will ever have to treat a disease as difficult and as deadly as the Ebola virus that has killed thousands in West Africa, as well as a number of doctors and nurses who traveled there to treat those affected by the outbreak. To care for the sick, prevent spread of disease, and protect themselves from infection, these healthcare workers rely on tons of equipment and supplies, including protective suits and masks, plastic sheeting to construct emergency care units, infrared thermometers to assist with screening, and low-tech yet essential chlorine and soap. Providers meet a less dramatic—but no less important—challenge every day in lower extremity practices, where they rely on good access to specialized products, materials, and services to give their patients the best possible clinical outcomes

Emily Delzell, Project editor Hopefully none of the practitioners who read LER will ever have to treat a disease as difficult and as deadly as the Ebola virus that has killed thousands in West Africa, as well as a number of doctors and nurses who traveled there to treat those affected by the outbreak. To care for the sick, prevent spread of disease, and protect themselves from infection, these healthcare workers rely on tons of equipment and supplies, including protective suits and masks, plastic sheeting to construct emergency care units, infrared thermometers to assist with screening, and low-tech yet essential chlorine and soap. Providers meet a less dramatic—but no less important—challenge every day in lower extremity practices, where they rely on good access to specialized products, materials, and services to give their patients the best possible clinical outcomes

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Out on a limb: Critical care