Type 1 diabetes linked to increased fractures

A population-based cohort study published using data from The Health Improvement Network was evaluated comparing records from 303,394 type 1 diabetes patients aged 0-89 years old with 303,872 random controls without type 1 diabetes. A growing amount of recent evidence has suggested type 1 diabetes may lead to impaired bone health and a fragile skeleton—something that increases a patient’s risk of fractures. While the exact mechanism behind this impaired bone health is unknown, this study sought to show evidence of an increased risk of fracture in type 1 diabetes patients.

A population-based cohort study published using data from The Health Improvement Network was evaluated comparing records from 303,394 type 1 diabetes patients aged 0-89 years old with 303,872 random controls without type 1 diabetes. A growing amount of recent evidence has suggested type 1 diabetes may lead to impaired bone health and a fragile skeleton—something that increases a patient’s risk of fractures. While the exact mechanism behind this impaired bone health is unknown, this study sought to show evidence of an increased risk of fracture in type 1 diabetes patients.

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Type 1 diabetes linked to increased fractures