The effect of facial blood flow on ratings of blushing and negative affect during an embarrassing task: Preliminary findings

Publication year: 2011 Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Available online 30 December 2011 Peter D. Drummond, Daniel Lazaroo Expecting to blush is a common source of social anxiety, and is associated with heightened perceptions of blushing and embarrassment. To assess whether sensory cues associated with heightened facial blood flow are an additional source of anxiety, the vasodilator niacin (100 mg) or placebo was administered double-blind to 33 participants, and facial blood flow was investigated when they sang a children’s song. Vasodilatation during singing was greater in the niacin than placebo condition, and niacin-evoked flushing and increases in pulse rate were greater in participants with high than low fear of negative evaluation

Publication year: 2011 Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders, Available online 30 December 2011 Peter D. Drummond, Daniel Lazaroo Expecting to blush is a common source of social anxiety, and is associated with heightened perceptions of blushing and embarrassment. To assess whether sensory cues associated with heightened facial blood flow are an additional source of anxiety, the vasodilator niacin (100 mg) or placebo was administered double-blind to 33 participants, and facial blood flow was investigated when they sang a children’s song. Vasodilatation during singing was greater in the niacin than placebo condition, and niacin-evoked flushing and increases in pulse rate were greater in participants with high than low fear of negative evaluation

Continued here:
The effect of facial blood flow on ratings of blushing and negative affect during an embarrassing task: Preliminary findings