Hot tip to predict ulcer risk: Repeat temperature test for best results

By Keith Loria The concept of foot temperature monitoring to identify areas of increased risk of ulceration in patients with diabetes is promising, but new research from the Netherlands suggests clinical use of the technology will require more than a single temperature assessment. In 20 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy recruited from a multidisciplinary Dutch foot clinic, investigators found that very few of the “warning signals” identified using a single assessment could be confirmed on subsequent days during the six-day study period. “If you want to use foot temperature measurements in clinical practice to prevent foot ulceration then you have to do more than single measurements,” said Jaap van Netten, PhD, coauthor of the study, senior researcher at Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, and adjunct associate professor at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia

By Keith Loria The concept of foot temperature monitoring to identify areas of increased risk of ulceration in patients with diabetes is promising, but new research from the Netherlands suggests clinical use of the technology will require more than a single temperature assessment. In 20 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy recruited from a multidisciplinary Dutch foot clinic, investigators found that very few of the “warning signals” identified using a single assessment could be confirmed on subsequent days during the six-day study period. “If you want to use foot temperature measurements in clinical practice to prevent foot ulceration then you have to do more than single measurements,” said Jaap van Netten, PhD, coauthor of the study, senior researcher at Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, and adjunct associate professor at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Australia

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Hot tip to predict ulcer risk: Repeat temperature test for best results