By itself, zero drop in a running shoe does not translate to barefoot-like gait

iStockphoto.com 511135767 A zero drop is not enough to notably alter the biomechanics of running in a cushioned shoe but may affect injury risk in some runners, according to research from Luxembourg presented at the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport, held in Monaco in March. The findings suggest that, although barefoot running by definition involves a zero drop from the heel to the toe, other design features may play a bigger role in determining the extent to which minimalist running shoes are associated with barefoot-like gait. Investigators from the Luxembourg Institute of Health randomized 553 runners to six months of running while wearing one of three experimental cushioned shoe styles that differed only in terms of shoe drop:  0, 6, or 10 mm.

iStockphoto.com 511135767 A zero drop is not enough to notably alter the biomechanics of running in a cushioned shoe but may affect injury risk in some runners, according to research from Luxembourg presented at the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport, held in Monaco in March. The findings suggest that, although barefoot running by definition involves a zero drop from the heel to the toe, other design features may play a bigger role in determining the extent to which minimalist running shoes are associated with barefoot-like gait. Investigators from the Luxembourg Institute of Health randomized 553 runners to six months of running while wearing one of three experimental cushioned shoe styles that differed only in terms of shoe drop:  0, 6, or 10 mm.

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By itself, zero drop in a running shoe does not translate to barefoot-like gait