Assessing runners’ gait using wearable sensors

Wearable sensors allow for the collection of running biomechanics data outside the laboratory in natural training environments, enabling clinicians to collect a large volume of information in a relatively short time to help identify and manage individuals who may be at risk for running-related injuries. By Rachel Koldenhoven, MEd, ATC; and Alex DeJong, MEd, ATC The majority of traditional running gait assessments represented in the medical literature have been captured in a laboratory setting. The laboratory equipment and techniques used to analyze gait are capable of producing precise measurements; however, these assessments are generally time consuming, expensive, and clinically impractical.

Wearable sensors allow for the collection of running biomechanics data outside the laboratory in natural training environments, enabling clinicians to collect a large volume of information in a relatively short time to help identify and manage individuals who may be at risk for running-related injuries. By Rachel Koldenhoven, MEd, ATC; and Alex DeJong, MEd, ATC The majority of traditional running gait assessments represented in the medical literature have been captured in a laboratory setting. The laboratory equipment and techniques used to analyze gait are capable of producing precise measurements; however, these assessments are generally time consuming, expensive, and clinically impractical.

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Assessing runners’ gait using wearable sensors